Work Ethic Chapter 3 Plan for Tomorrow Questions

The questions are from each chapter of my book called Work Ethic. They are designed to create thought so that you will be able to focus on the desires you see yourself accomplishing in your lifetime. Answer the questions as best as you can and then get to work accomplishing the construction of your personal desires.

The Prepared Lifestyle

1. Where are you spending a bulk of your free time?

2. Outside of school, how much time do you spend on the things that will help you achieve your goals vs. things that waste time?

3. How much time per week can you dedicate to doing the things that will lead to the results you want?

4. Can you partner with someone, or have a person check on your progress, as you remove time-wasters from your life?

5. What results do you expect to see when you remove time-wasters and use time more productively?

Pierce Brunson http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00I10A3XK , M.Ed., is a graduate of Temple University in Philadelphia, and spends his time working as a mentor and speaker while developing businesses that help improve the high school experience for students and teachers. He has over a decade of experience teaching in the public school system as a high school Social Studies teacher, majoring in World History and Sociology. Pierce believes everyone can do more to help improve the education system in their local communities, which is part of the backbone of any society. Pierce’s advice is simple: stop complaining and do something to help improve the situation. Good people have to stop being afraid to fight for what they believe in. Get in the game, help others, share culture and move the world toward equality and justice. Connect with Pierce at http://www.piercebrunson.com, http://www.fireflyeventphotography.com, and http://www.piercebrunsonphotography.com.

My Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/truthisnear17/videos

 

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Working for the Team

Chapter 7: It’s All About the Team

As you grow, develop, and experience, you will notice that the people you associate with can make or break you. Your team of people have to be the ones that understand your desired life outcomes.

Much of this book was developed because of the processes I learned from playing and coaching sports. The reason I like the pressure of sports is because there is only one championship that every team is fighting for. This makes everything you do very important.  As a coach, I knew I wanted to win a state championship. I knew that if I made the right actions as a coach, I would be able to develop the right players, and I could improve my chances of achieving this goal.

The biggest lesson I learned as a coach is that you can’t push so hard that you alienate your team. There is a perfect balance that must be achieved so that the team players understand not only what the goal is, but what is at stake if the goal isn’t attained.

Another issue is finding the right combination of players that desire to achieve this goal. Winning championships isn’t one of the wishes of a lot of players at the high school level. Many just like playing the sport, win or lose. Some enjoy the friends that come from the connections made through the sport. Leadership can only push so far before the players and their attitude win out. No matter how hard I would push, my players were only going to grow as far as they wanted. If they wouldn’t pay the price of dedication and development to a championship level, then you can’t expect a championship.

One of the best things I learned in my last season of coaching had to do with calling plays. That year, I honestly called great and timely plays, but the team just didn’t execute. That year, we lost more games than I had ever experienced as a coach. Conversely, there were years early in my career where the players would stay extra after practice to work on a few skills. That team ended up being ranked fourth in the state after a loss to the eventual champion.

What did I learn from those experiences? Simply put, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make them drink. Now, both of these teams had excellent student athletes, good kids, and great parental support but when it came down to what they wanted, both were as different as night and day. The team I coached that went 14-1 hated when any team scored on them. They hated when they dropped a pass. They hated being late to practice. They hated missing practice. They hated anything that didn’t have to do with their individual success and the success of the team. My team that went 2-8 didn’t mind those losses as much as my championship team. I realized that most of the players on that team were there for the experience of playing on a team, and weren’t ready to accept the mindset to be champions.

Being a champion takes a lot of effort, and can be overwhelming to a core of kids that just want to play the game. My championship team was thinking about going to a state championship two years before they had their opportunity.

This is a part of a chapter from my book Learning Curve: How to Prepare For Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going by Pierce Brunson. Every Monday and Thursday for the next 12 weeks I will share parts of the book starting today 3/17/2014.  The next shares will come from my new book Rock The Crowd (Wednesday/ Friday Schedule starting 4/21/2014), a book that helps teachers give the best performances of their life as they teach their students.

Learning Curve: How To Prepare for Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going is dedicated to helping the high school student that desires success in life but doesn’t know exactly what they want to do or how to do it.  During this confusing and stressful time most students just pick a college major or get a job and just hope things work out. Well, that strategy is terrible!  The best strategy includes learning and adding the characteristics in this book to one’s personality so that as the right opportunities come along the student can take hold of them.  Learning Curve is the jumpstart information that helps teens prevent a lifetime of wishing, “if only someone would have told me”, once valuable opportunities have gone away.

Direct Link: https://www.createspace.com/4626501

Follow this blog to enjoy more samples from the book.

The Characteristics to Success

Section II: The Characteristics to Success

Always remember to make these characteristics your own so that you head in the direction you desire. Living your path and being of value to others will deliver you with multiple chances to have the focused and productive life you seek. If you are floating, then you are in the right place to make the right decisions so you can achieve the success you desire. Trust me on that.

While going through all of the following values, take a few moments weekly to see how small wins are starting to happen in your life. As you notice these small steps, you will notice yourself moving toward your goal. If your steps are taking you away from your goal, then you need to make a pivot. We all have to make pivots from time to time.

Be kind to yourself and others. We all make mistakes. Apologize for your mistakes and wrong doings so you can get back on track as fast as possible. Not everyone is going to forgive you for your wrong doings, so make them as small and infrequent as possible. Cherish the opportunity to see how far you have come in a month, semester, and then a year. Celebrate little wins with more action in the right direction, and celebrate bigger wins with others while doing something you enjoy.

You can’t work all the time, as the body and mind need a break. Yes, you can remain as structured and disciplined as possible, but you will burnout if you don’t take necessary, scheduled breaks. During your breaks, do something different to stimulate or relax other parts of your brain. If you have a relaxing destination or getaway, then feel free to use this space so you won’t overload yourself. There is a balance that is needed, and you don’t have to be a superhero. Leave that to the people in the comic books.

Trust that you can do it. Everyone starts from the bottom. This book started with one word, and from there it just grew as I was typing according to my goals. You will need all kinds of faith, trust, belief, and that “can do” spirit that you can muster for this journey, but you will make it if you get used to pivoting and not quitting.

This is a part of a chapter from my book Learning Curve: How to Prepare For Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going by Pierce Brunson. Every Monday and Thursday for the next 12 weeks I will share parts of the book starting today 3/17/2014.  The next shares will come from my new book Rock The Crowd (Wednesday/ Friday Schedule starting 4/21/2014), a book that helps teachers give the best performances of their life as they teach their students.

Learning Curve: How To Prepare for Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going is dedicated to helping the high school student that desires success in life but doesn’t know exactly what they want to do or how to do it.  During this confusing and stressful time most students just pick a college major or get a job and just hope things work out. Well, that strategy is terrible!  The best strategy includes learning and adding the characteristics in this book to one’s personality so that as the right opportunities come along the student can take hold of them.  Learning Curve is the jumpstart information that helps teens prevent a lifetime of wishing, “if only someone would have told me”, once valuable opportunities have gone away.

Direct Link: https://www.createspace.com/4626501

Follow this blog to enjoy more samples from the book.

Wasting College Years

Chapter 2: High School to Early College

Let’s forget my friend and his amazing “career knowing” at the middle school educational level, and fast forward to high school. To me, good grades only mattered to my parents. As long as I stayed off restriction or avoided the near death experiences of a beat down by my dad, my grades were good enough to me (mind you, in those days it was ok to bust a kid’s ass if they did something wrong). In high school, I continued to play baseball, and as a freshman, I wanted to attend the University of Georgia to continue playing. They had just won the national championship, and one of their players was from a local high school that we played, so I wanted to continue to play baseball. I busted my butt to get better. I worked on my game before there were videos and private coaches that came to your home. Good career move, or so I thought.

Thinking about this moment as it relates to my teaching career, I remember having had many freshmen enter my classes where they would express ideas like this. They had a pretty big dream, but were not ready, or in a position, to achieve any part of it. At least I was on the team and working hard. Many students I have had will say these outlandish dreams and aren’t even in the right solar system to achieve them.

One thing that I was lucky to have in my educational life was the art magnet program. Thank goodness for the Pinellas County Center for the Arts, and the teachers that pushed us to be skilled artists. I was able to spend three hours a day focusing on and producing some sort of project. With the program having real expectations of results, I needed a concentration. I enjoyed the support of a great art teacher that gave me the challenge of throwing 25lbs of clay on the wheel, “because baseball players need strong hands”. Once I became a senior, I focused on ceramics. At that time, I envisioned a life with a house of my own with a wheel and kiln in the back. I still smile at that vision because I have never shared it with anyone. I did envision a small house where I just worked with, and produced, this amazing stuff that people wanted. That vision made me happy, so at least I wanted to do something that made me smile. There was also a problem with that vision. I didn’t want to go to a “nerdy” art school with no real sports teams, so I avoided Art College at all costs. I see that as at least knowing where I didn’t want to go.

Maybe my mistake was thinking things would be different once I got into college. I really thought college would be more challenging. To me, it became an extension of what I didn’t like in high school; more studying and writing papers. I became more lost once I got to the place where I was supposed to find my direction in life. At this Tennessee college, I was one lost soul. If I didn’t say anything in high school, where I knew people, I definitely wasn’t going to say anything to new people, in this new place, where I barely knew anyone. Where were the inspiring teachers that I knew in the high school art program? The “what” I was going to become turned into just-pick-something-panic-time because I still had no idea. Coming from an intense art program, and now not having those teachers that had interest in my educational success left me feeling alone in my decision of what to study. So, looking at what I was good at, I decided to be an art major. Big mistake. I had to start over at the bottom of basic drawing classes after spending three hours a day throwing on the wheel while in high school. I had a great portfolio of my skill, but I had to slum it in lower level classes that paced me into a fog of disinterest. As you probably guessed, art didn’t hold my attention. After the first year, I was packing my stuff and heading back to Florida. One year of college, and I was further away from any knowledge of where I wanted to head in life. Back home, I did what my long lost friends were doing; taking classes at the local junior college. Many of the things I was involved in were hobbies, and my choices lacked any real connection to what I wanted to be in the immediate or near future.

After finishing the AA degree, it was time to head back off to a 4-year university. Well, now it was time again to pick the college of my dreams. You know, the place that is right for you, where you will become something great by entering their educational facilities, taking some classes, and graduating to a fruitful life. Once again, I am still believing that college will be this golden ticket when just two years before it wasn’t. Ah, yeah, not that I missed the memo on what I wanted to do, but I still just didn’t know. So, once again, I was at a major college and still stuck on trying to really know if this choice of major was right for me. I was literally experiencing the same thing where other students were picking from a list of majors to study and I had no clue of what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. At that point I just wanted to know how other people knew that the major they were picking was right for them.

So, after a summer of videotaping my friends, I decided to be a film major and study secondary education. This choice was hardly on the road to personal success and inspiration, but finally I could see a light at the end of the tunnel.

 

This is a part of a chapter from my book Learning Curve: How to Prepare For Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going by Pierce Brunson. Every Monday and Thursday for the next 12 weeks I will share parts of the book starting today 3/17/2014.  The next shares will come from my new book Rock The Crowd (Wednesday/ Friday Schedule starting 4/21/2014), a book that helps teachers give the best performances of their life as they teach their students.

Learning Curve: How To Prepare for Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going is dedicated to helping the high school student that desires success in life but doesn’t know exactly what they want to do or how to do it.  During this confusing and stressful time most students just pick a college major or get a job and just hope things work out. Well, that strategy is terrible!  The best strategy includes learning and adding the characteristics in this book to one’s personality so that as the right opportunities come along the student can take hold of them.  Learning Curve is the jumpstart information that helps teens prevent a lifetime of wishing, “if only someone would have told me”, once valuable opportunities have gone away.

Direct Link: https://www.createspace.com/4626501

Follow this blog to enjoy more samples from the book.

Learning Curve: Floating Along

Chapter 1: Floating Along

What do you do when you finally wake up to your talents and abilities and you are 33 years old? Who do you tell your dreams to when your peers are working, starting families, and seem to have found their niche in life? What do you do with the loneliness of indecision at such a late age? How do you stop the grinding of your soul begging for more from you, and you don’t know where to start? Welcome to my world, 9 years ago. I finally got to the point where I felt I had to do something I really wanted to do with my life. You see, I fell under that category of a person that has many talents, but hasn’t found where they should fit in society. When this happens, you rarely develop any of your talents; they just sit dormant as you stare off into space hoping for an answer. Years ago I started to read a ton of books about success, business people, and things written by people who have found their “thing” in life. These readings inspired me to really go for “it.” But what was “it?” Did I want to be a doctor, lawyer, continue to be a high school teacher, or do something else?

I found that my classroom and coaching duties were fulfilling, but there seemed to be this limit to what I could accomplish and be awarded while in those roles. I watched as many of my friends were having success in life, and I wondered, how do they know what they want to do?

How do we discover what we want to do in a world where those that know what they want to do have a leg up, and seem to get there faster? Why do most of us float around, even though we have college degrees, for decades before we find something that really causes us to jump out of bed in the morning and go for it in life? I don’t know about where your confusion level started, but I know that mine started in high school.

While in high school, I realized that my life plan wasn’t going to be the status quo of picking a major and entering the workforce in that field.  There were so many things I was interested in, and pretty good at doing, that when it came down to picking a college and a major, I froze and went with what I had always been doing; visual art. I had no real understanding of how to turn that into a rewarding career, or find a job in that field; I just assumed it would happen. As I developed and moved along to another college, I found myself saying things like, “I like ______________”, or “I think _____________ would be cool.”  Not the best way to grow and develop the skills necessary to live the life that you desire. Those blanks were filled with many different thoughts.

This is a part of chapter one from my book Learning Curve: How to Prepare For Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going by Pierce Brunson. Every Monday and Thursday for the next 12 weeks I will share parts of the book starting today 3/17/2014.  The next shares will come from my new book Rock The Crowd (Wednesday/ Friday Schedule starting 4/21/2014), a book that helps teachers give the best performances of their life as they teach their students.

Learning Curve: How To Prepare for Success When You Don’t Know Where Your Life Is Going is dedicated to helping the high school student that desires success in life but doesn’t know exactly what they want to do or how to do it.  During this confusing and stressful time most students just pick a college major or get a job and just hope things work out. Well, that strategy is terrible!  The best strategy includes learning and adding the characteristics in this book to one’s personality so that as the right opportunities come along the student can take hold of them.  Learning Curve is the jumpstart information that helps teens prevent a lifetime of wishing, “if only someone would have told me”, once valuable opportunities have gone away.

Direct Link: https://www.createspace.com/4626501

Follow this blog to enjoy more samples from the book.

My name is Pierce Brunson and my focus in life is to make the high school experience more valuable, rewarding, and memorable for students and teachers through quality product and service development.

Rock The Crowd!

Rock the Crowd

How The Cool Teachers Inspire More Students, Earn More Respect, and Become Lifelong Mentors.

Is there anything better for students then being in the class of the cool teacher?  When it comes to being a student and being forced to attend school there is nothing better. How do these popular teachers continue to be the sparkle in the eyes of so many children while there are others that can’t get them to pay attention.  Rock The Crowd shares the methods of those teachers that are considered cool by students while maintaining the best relationships for valuable learning to take place.  For the “cool teacher” the front of their classroom is their stage and every day, for hours they give the greatest performance their students have seen to date.  The crowd rocker teaches with passion and convictions that inspire real student connections with that last a lifetime.  This connection helps the student to focus on learning and understanding the importance of having a quality education. These teachers are popular year after year while other teachers are struggling to relate to students.  In Rock the Crowd, I share all the things that cool teachers do that make them so successful in working with and producing successful and long lasting results.

Pierce Brunson’s education includes Lynch Elementary, Meadowlawn Middle, Gibbs Senior High School (and the Pinellas County Center for the Arts) in St. Petersburg, FL Temple University in Philadelphia  and Wilmington University in Delaware.  He has 13 years teaching in the public school system as a high school Social Studies teacher majoring in World History and Sociology.  As a teacher, Pierce had a natural gift to rock the crowd and everyday he knew the power of taking the stage in front of students and their moldable minds.  Being a natural leech for ideas that work, Pierce started to use the techniques of other campus crowd rockers to greatly improve his teaching techniques.  In 2012 Pierce stepped away from the classroom to pursue the personal challenge of positively affecting 10,000+ students a year with Firefly Event Photography, his company that captures images that reflect the personality of high school students at their homecomings, proms, and graduations.  The second part of his life involves developing content that helps high school students grow the best skills possible to follow their personal path to success.  Anytime Pierce has the opportunity to speak to teachers or students he is only thinking of one thing before he starts…Rock the Crowd!